Health Problems Related to Stress That You Can Fix

Stress (biology), an organism’s response to a stressor such as an environmental condition
Stress (journal), a medical journal
Stress (linguistics), relative emphasis or prominence given to a syllable in a word, or to a word in a phrase or sentence
Stress (mechanics), the internal forces that neighboring particles of a continuous material exert on each other
Occupational stress, stress related to one’s job
Psychological stress, a feeling of strain and pressure
Surgical stress, systemic response to surgical injury.

Psychological stress

In psychology, stress is a feeling of strain and pressure. Also this is one type of psychological pain. [1] Small amounts of stress may be desired, beneficial, and even healthy. Positive stress helps improve athletic performance. It also plays a factor in motivation, adaptation, and reaction to the environment. Excessive amounts of stress, however, may lead to bodily harm. Stress can increase the risk of strokes, heart attacks, ulcers, dwarfism, and mental illnesses such as depression.

Stress can be external and related to the environment, but may also be created by internal perceptions that cause an individual to experience anxiety or other negative emotions surrounding a situation, such as pressure, discomfort, etc., which they then deem stressful.

Humans experience stress, or perceive things as threatening, when they do not believe that their resources for coping with obstacles (stimuli, people, situations, etc.) are enough for what the circumstances demand. When people think the demands being placed on them exceed their ability to cope, they then perceive stress.

How to Come Out Stress 

Try this.

Listen to music
Call a friend
Talk yourself through it
Eat right Time
Be mindful
Exercise
Sleep better
Breathe easy

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Identify what’s causing stress.
Monitor your state of mind throughout the day. If you feel stressed, write down the cause, your thoughts and your mood. Once you know what’s bothering you, develop a plan for addressing it.That might mean setting more reasonable expectations for yourself and others or asking for help with household responsibilities, job assignments or other tasks. List all your commitments, assess your priorities and then eliminate any tasks that are not absolutely essential.

Build strong relationships.
Relationships can be a source of stress. Research has found that negative, hostile reactions with your spouse cause immediate changes in stress-sensitive hormones, for example.7 But relationships can also serve as stress buffers. Reach out to family members or close friends and let them know you’re having a tough time. They may be able to offer practical assistance and support, useful ideas or just a fresh perspective as you begin to tackle whatever is causing your stress.

Walk away when you’re angry.
Before you react, take time to regroup by counting to 10. Then reconsider. Walking or other physical activities can also help you work off steam. Plus, exercise increases the production of endorphins, your body’s natural mood-booster. Commit to a daily walk or other form of exercise — a small step that can make a big difference in reducing stress levels

Rest your mind.

According to APA’s 2012 Stress in America™ survey, stress keeps more than 40 percent of adults lying awake at night. To help ensure you get the recommended seven or eight hours of shut-eye, cut back on caffeine, remove distractions such as television or computers from your bedroom, and go to bed at the same time each night. Research shows that activities like yoga and relaxation exercises not only help reduce stress, but also boost immune functioning.

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